• Date, POSIXct, and POSIXlt are converted, with the timezone respected, using clock::as_date().

  • Character input is parsed by two methods. Firstly, if format = NULL then character input is first checked to see if it is in the format of "YYYY-Www" (e.g. "2021-W03") and parsed accordingly. If it is in a different format, or format is non-NULL then it is parsed using clock::date_parse().

as_yearweek(x, firstday = 1L, ...)

# S3 method for default
as_yearweek(x, firstday = 1L, ...)

# S3 method for character
as_yearweek(
  x,
  firstday = 1L,
  format = "%Y-%m-%d",
  locale = clock_locale(),
  ...
)

# S3 method for factor
as_yearweek(x, firstday = 1L, format = NULL, locale = clock_locale(), ...)

Arguments

x

An object to coerce to yearweekly.

firstday

An integer representing the day the week starts on from 1 (Monday) to 7 (Sunday).

...

Not currently used.

format

[character / NULL]

A format string. A combination of the following commands, or NULL, in which case a default format string is used.

A vector of multiple format strings can be supplied. They will be tried in the order they are provided.

Year

  • %C: The century as a decimal number. The modified command %NC where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 2. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

  • %y: The last two decimal digits of the year. If the century is not otherwise specified (e.g. with %C), values in the range [69 - 99] are presumed to refer to the years [1969 - 1999], and values in the range [00 - 68] are presumed to refer to the years [2000 - 2068]. The modified command %Ny, where N is a positive decimal integer, specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 2. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

  • %Y: The year as a decimal number. The modified command %NY where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 4. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

Month

  • %b, %B, %h: The locale's full or abbreviated case-insensitive month name.

  • %m: The month as a decimal number. January is 1. The modified command %Nm where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 2. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

Day

  • %d, %e: The day of the month as a decimal number. The modified command %Nd where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 2. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

Day of the week

  • %a, %A: The locale's full or abbreviated case-insensitive weekday name.

  • %w: The weekday as a decimal number (0-6), where Sunday is 0. The modified command %Nw where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 1. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

ISO 8601 week-based year

  • %g: The last two decimal digits of the ISO week-based year. The modified command %Ng where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 2. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

  • %G: The ISO week-based year as a decimal number. The modified command %NG where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 4. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

  • %V: The ISO week-based week number as a decimal number. The modified command %NV where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 2. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

  • %u: The ISO weekday as a decimal number (1-7), where Monday is 1. The modified command %Nu where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 1. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

Week of the year

  • %U: The week number of the year as a decimal number. The first Sunday of the year is the first day of week 01. Days of the same year prior to that are in week 00. The modified command %NU where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 2. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

  • %W: The week number of the year as a decimal number. The first Monday of the year is the first day of week 01. Days of the same year prior to that are in week 00. The modified command %NW where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 2. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

Day of the year

  • %j: The day of the year as a decimal number. January 1 is 1. The modified command %Nj where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 3. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

Date

  • %D, %x: Equivalent to %m/%d/%y.

  • %F: Equivalent to %Y-%m-%d. If modified with a width (like %NF), the width is applied to only %Y.

Time of day

  • %H: The hour (24-hour clock) as a decimal number. The modified command %NH where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 2. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

  • %I: The hour (12-hour clock) as a decimal number. The modified command %NI where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 2. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

  • %M: The minutes as a decimal number. The modified command %NM where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is 2. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

  • %S: The seconds as a decimal number. The modified command %NS where N is a positive decimal integer specifies the maximum number of characters to read. If not specified, the default is determined by the precision that you are parsing at. If encountered, the locale determines the decimal point character. Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.

  • %p: The locale's equivalent of the AM/PM designations associated with a 12-hour clock. The command %I must precede %p in the format string.

  • %R: Equivalent to %H:%M.

  • %T, %X: Equivalent to %H:%M:%S.

  • %r: Equivalent to %I:%M:%S %p.

Time zone

  • %z: The offset from UTC in the format [+|-]hh[mm]. For example -0430 refers to 4 hours 30 minutes behind UTC. And 04 refers to 4 hours ahead of UTC. The modified command %Ez parses a : between the hours and minutes and leading zeroes on the hour field are optional: [+|-]h[h][:mm]. For example -04:30 refers to 4 hours 30 minutes behind UTC. And 4 refers to 4 hours ahead of UTC.

  • %Z: The full time zone name or the time zone abbreviation, depending on the function being used. A single word is parsed. This word can only contain characters that are alphanumeric, or one of '_', '/', '-' or '+'.

Miscellaneous

  • %c: A date and time representation. Equivalent to %a %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y.

  • %%: A % character.

  • %n: Matches one white space character. %n, %t, and a space can be combined to match a wide range of white-space patterns. For example "%n " matches one or more white space characters, and "%n%t%t" matches one to three white space characters.

  • %t: Matches zero or one white space characters.

locale

[clock_locale]

A locale object created from clock_locale().

Value

A grates_yearweek object.

Note

Internally grates_yearweek objects are stored as the number of weeks from the date of the firstday nearest the Unix Epoch (1970-01-01). That is:

- 1969-12-29 for `firstday` as Monday
- 1969-12-30 for `firstday` as Tuesday
- 1969-12-31 for `firstday` as Wednesday
- 1970-01-01 for `firstday` as Thursday
- 1970-01-02 for `firstday` as Friday
- 1970-01-03 for `firstday` as Saturday
- 1970-01-04 for `firstday` as Sunday

See also

Examples

as_yearweek(Sys.Date())
#> <grates_yearweek[1]> #> [1] 2021-W21
as_yearweek(as.POSIXct("2019-03-04 01:01:01", tz = "America/New_York"))
#> <grates_yearweek[1]> #> [1] 2019-W10
as_yearweek("2019-05-03", firstday = 5L)
#> <grates_yearweek[1]> #> [1] 2019-W18
as_yearweek("2021-W03", format = NULL)
#> <grates_yearweek[1]> #> [1] 2021-W03